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GEMINI SPACE DISTORTIONS

#1
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Gemini starsystem is known by its countless space anomalies. First ship that experienced that brutal reality was "Armande", and she was among first few imperial research vessels that entered Gemini when construction of Starpoint was halfway done. Armande was lost and only a handful of crew escaped with few escape pods. Full investigation was ordered and scientific missions determined that very fabric of gravity fields in Gemini is fragile and unstable. Some claimed it is due to large number of planets in system, and their relative proximity. Others believed disturbances are caused by mutual interactions of two suns in the middle of sector zero. Whatever the case was, Gemini remained a potentially dangerous area, but lure of many habitable planets for colonization was just too strong.
End of the first Gemini war, and repercussions of Starpoint Incident raised threat level to new apocalyptic dimensions. Unstable universe was torn apart by massive subspace detonation and effects of anomalies multiplied many times over. Planets nearest to explosion were instantly scorched, and all remaining space in Gemini was entangled in a dense web of stasis rifts and deadly ruptures. In the years following this disaster, situation slowly improved and science found new ways to contain thousands of anomalies. Biggest single breakthrough was made by young brilliant scientist Elenor Ridley, who studied and developed technology to locate and disperse stasis rift subspace pockets. Still, to this day, countless ships were lost to these space abominations. Most captains simply learned to coexist with space distrubances, while those bold enough, even found ways to use them in some cases as tactical advantage...
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#2
amazing picture and lore piece. We want more. MORE!!
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#3
I'm not sure where exactly to ask this, but I think here is close.

I asked this on Twitter too but didn't get a reply so I'll try here: I realize the Gemini system is a binary system (and given the colours of the suns, a *very* young system at that). However, the background nebula and extremely bright points of light interspersed begs the question: Is the Gemini system located within a "stellar nursery"?

(If so, it would make the existence of so many habitable planets even stranger. Two very young stars located in a stellar nursery even having planetary bodies would be interesting; a habitable planet would be astounding; several habitable planets wouldn't be possible. At least not without help - a lot of help.)
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#4
Now you gave me a lot to think on... Main idea was that Gemini was from the start a very unique system. No imperial colony (Sirius, Orion etc...) has so many inhabitable planets in a single system. It was one of the greates lures Gemini had to offer... But, reading your scientific explanation made me wonder a bit...
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#5
The aliens made it as a trap so they could lure humanity to it and harvest them Wink
i7 6700k @4.4ghz 32GB DDR4 2x EVGA GTX 1080 FTW Asus z170 pro gaming MB
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#6
The simplest answer that would be plausible is simply terraforming. It would be expensive and time consuming, but offers a reasonable explanation to the amount of inhabitable planets. Then again, if we're discussing about reality, Planet Carthagena atleast, would be nearly, if not completely, inhabitable due to sheer heat of the nearby twin stars, Pollux and Castor. It is simply far too close. Tongue
Immi viros, rios, tovtias-rii.
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#7
Why exactly would a stellar nursery have few habitable planets.... Sol was born in a stellar Nursery and we live on one of her planets Smile.

Binary systems are also actually the norm in our galaxy, single star systems are actually rare.

The stars colours mean they are massive so would burn out quickly... but if the planets around them where captured from other systems it would explain them perfectly... and we have detected rogue planets so they are known to exist.

Not to mention the whole stasis thing... what if the planets were sent back in time... so they are older then they appear...

Or if only one planet exists... and all the planets in the system are the same planet at a different age...

lots of fun can be had with sci-fi.
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#8
(10-02-2014, 06:08 AM)Khevor Wrote: (If so, it would make the existence of so many habitable planets even stranger. Two very young stars located in a stellar nursery even having planetary bodies would be interesting; a habitable planet would be astounding; several habitable planets wouldn't be possible. At least not without help - a lot of help.)

Dude, it's a binary star system with multiple planets that don't move, and if they did they'd be in almost the same orbit. I don't think "realistic universe" is one of the main criteria here. It's pretty, and it's fun, we might want to suspend our disbelief and leave it at that? Maybe? Tongue

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Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again hoping for a different result. Except if you're gaming, then it's called grinding.
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